A handcrafted bath and body brand, established in 2013 in Newport, Rhode Island. Shore Soap Co. channels their inspiration from the sea to create quality products that portray nature and simplicity. Depending on your perspective the sea can be many things; beautiful and alarming, serene and turbulent, warm and chilling.

We strive to use packaging that has the least impact on our environment and especially oceans. We've reduced our usage of plastic to only the most necessary items and closures and strongly encourage proper recycling. Our preference is for highly recyclable glass and biodegradable cardboard where possible.

Our products are sulfate and paraben free and also free from palm oils. We use natural ingredients and never test our products on animals. We don't hide our ingredients; it's all on the label.

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Our primary scents

Atlantic

Amber fruit, white jasmine, sweet lavender, and floral musk.

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Boardwalk

Warm, rich and comforting smokey sandalwood and creamy vanilla.

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Changing Tide

Lemon, rosemary, sandalwood, patchouli, musk, and vetiver.

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Coconut Bikini

Luscious coconut with hints of warm vanilla and exotic musk.

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Daydream

Sun-drenched cedarwood and refreshing hints of citrus drift through the balmy air.

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Endless Summer

Sparkling bergamot, juicy mandarin, fresh coconut, wildflowers, wrapped in soft amber.

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Lazy Lavender

Lush fields of lavender swaying peacefully from side to side.

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Mermaid Kisses

Fusion of golden amber & musk kissed with a hint of citrus & pink jasmine.

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Pacific

Meyer lemon, dry amber, white jasmine, sweet lavender, and vanilla ambrette.

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Salty Mariner

Salty air, fresh raindrops mixed with slight floral hints, luscious greens, pine and musk.

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Smooth Sailing

Smooth Sailing

Hints of decadent amber and musk swirl through the crisp ocean breeze.

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Warm Sand

Warm Sand

Sea spray, salt, jasmine and mandarin.

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it's back

Salty Mariner

Salty air, fresh raindrops mixed with slight floral hints, luscious greens, pine and musk.

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Captain's Cocktail Lip Balm

lip balm

Captain's Cocktail

Moisturize and soften dry or chapped lips.

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new gear

Wave Sweatshirt

Ultra-soft, premium ring-spun cotton.

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#cleantheshore

8 million metric tons of plastic enter our oceans each year.

Each year, around eight million metric tons of plastic waste invade our oceans. Reports show that most plastic packaging is only used once; 95% of the value of plastic packaging material, worth $80 billion-$120 billion annually, is lost to the economy after a short first use. The New Plastics Economy, an initiative led by the Ellen MacArthur Foundation (in collaboration with a broad group of leading companies, cities, philanthropists, policymakers, academics, students, NGOs, and citizens), is rethinking and redesigning the future of plastics, starting with the packaging. This ambitious three-year initiative provides a vision of a global economy in which plastics never become waste and outlines concrete steps towards achieving the systemic shift needed.

weforum.org/newplasticseconomy.org

Every minute, the equivalent of 1 garbage truck of plastic is dumped into our oceans.

Studies undertaken by the World Economic Forum, the Ellen MacArthur Foundation and McKinsey & Company have showed the scale of the breakdown in the global plastic system. Of the 78 million tons of plastic packaging being produced annually, a full 32% of the plastic is left to flow into our oceans, the equivalent of one garbage truck of plastic being dumped into the ocean each minute.

weforum.org/plasticoceans.org

At current rates, by 2050 there will be more plastic than fish in the world’s oceans.

According to reports, if we keep producing (and failing to properly dispose of) plastic at predicted rates, plastic in the ocean will outweigh fish by 2050. The World Economic Forum has reported that the worldwide uses of plastic has increased 20-fold in the past 50 years, and is expected to double again in the next 20 years. By 2050, we’ll be producing more than three times as much plastic as we did in 2014.

weforum.org / washingtonpost.com

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